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Cross polarization radiation pattern

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Hi All,

I want to plot the cross polarization radiation pattern of a simple dipole antenna. Could you plesae tell me how I can do it? Or can you please show it in the attached file.

Thanks Shaghayegh



1 Reply Last Post 12 Feb 2019, 16:24 GMT-5

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Posted: 8 months ago 12 Feb 2019, 16:24 GMT-5
Updated: 8 months ago 12 Feb 2019, 16:31 GMT-5

Well, your dipole is along the z axis. You can plot the x,y, and z components of Efar separately, if you wish. Just look at the options in the pull down menus in the post-processing. Now, to determine what vector components should be considered co- and cross-pol, you'll need to think a little and do a little trignonometry. I'll start: In the far field, there should be no radial component. So that leaves only a theta and phi component. The theta component would appear to be the co-pol, since it lines up with the dipole in any plane that contains the dipole. So that leaves the phi component as the cross-pol. So... all you need to know is how to obtain the phi-component from the cartesian far-field components. And... I presume you won't have trouble finding that information. :)

Note: From the axi-symmetry of the geometry, you won't have any non-zero phi component except for numerical noise, anyway. But if you add other objects to break the symmetry, you could then get such components.

Well, your dipole is along the z axis. You can plot the x,y, and z components of Efar separately, if you wish. Just look at the options in the pull down menus in the post-processing. Now, to determine what vector components should be considered co- and cross-pol, you'll need to think a little and do a little trignonometry. I'll start: In the far field, there should be no radial component. So that leaves only a theta and phi component. The theta component would appear to be the co-pol, since it lines up with the dipole in any plane that contains the dipole. So that leaves the phi component as the cross-pol. So... all you need to know is how to obtain the phi-component from the cartesian far-field components. And... I presume you won't have trouble finding that information. :) Note: From the axi-symmetry of the geometry, you won't have any non-zero phi component except for numerical noise, anyway. But if you add other objects to break the symmetry, you could then get such components.

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