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cable

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Hello! Cable losses in official submarine cables follow the law of conservation of energy, that is, the sum of core loss plus metal sheath loss plus armor loss is equal to three times the square of core current multiplied by core AC resistance. In IEC standard, cable core loss is the square of core current multiplied by core AC resistance. These two are contradictory. How do you understand them? Thank you


1 Reply Last Post 27 Mar 2019, 09:33 GMT-4
Edgar J. Kaiser Certified Consultant

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Posted: 7 months ago 27 Mar 2019, 09:33 GMT-4

I do not really see a contradiction. The first approach seems to be something like an engineering rule of thumb. The second approach is correct for losses in a resistor:

However R is the DC resistance. The AC impedance, that is the reactive or imaginary part of the impedance is not creating losses.

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Edgar J. Kaiser
emPhys Physical Technology
www.emphys.com
I do not really see a contradiction. The first approach seems to be something like an engineering rule of thumb. The second approach is correct for losses in a resistor: P = I^2 \cdot R However R is the DC resistance. The AC impedance, that is the reactive or imaginary part of the impedance is not creating losses.

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